Cumberland Valley

June 23, 2016
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No camping for 17 miles! It’s the traverse across Cumberland Valley, PA that includes the town of Boiling Springs. The trail skirts farms and crosses a dozen roads, including the PA Turnpike, US 11, and I-81. Most hikers hoof it across the 17-mile stretch of easy walking all in one day. We did that as well in 2007 when we walked south. This time, we’re doing the stretch over two days, with a hotel stop in the middle.

The corridor of the trail is owned by the Park Service as what is known as Appalachian Trail Lands. In the Cumberland Valley, signs tell us this, along with the information that these lands are being farmed to preserve the historical and pastoral quality of the area.

It is satisfying to walk on a path through cropfields of wheat, corn, and oats. In one field, a farmer  was  harvesting wheat as we walked by!

Clouds billowed all day, blackening then clearing, then building up in white again. The predicted storm held off!

Although I’m happy to rest my feet after our 15.5-mile walk, the scenery was delightful, diverse, and a welcome contrast to the rocky forest ridges. Enjoy the photos!

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From  forest to cornfield!

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Narrow path traverses fields.

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Historic Sycamore in Boiling Springs.

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Pastoral land, newly harvested.

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A meadow of Milkweed for Monarch butterflies breaks the crops.

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Clouds billow above the oats.

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Safe crossing over the highway where we get off the trail for a night in a hotel near Carlisle, PA.

In joy,
Regina

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http://eepurl.com/Lpft1

Cumberland Valley

June 23, 2016
Click “Read in browser” for pictures!

No camping for 17 miles! It’s the traverse across Cumberland Valley, PA that includes the town of Boiling Springs. The trail skirts farms and crosses a dozen roads, including the PA Turnpike, US 11, and I-81. Most hikers hoof it across the 17-mile stretch of easy walking all in one day. We did that as well in 2007 when we walked south. This time, we’re doing the stretch over two days, with a hotel stop in the middle.

The corridor of the trail is owned by the Park Service as what is known as Appalachian Trail Lands. In the Cumberland Valley, signs tell us this, along with the information that these lands are being farmed to preserve the historical and pastoral quality of the area.

It is satisfying to walk on a path through cropfields of wheat, corn, and oats. In one field, a farmer  was  harvesting wheat as we walked by!

Clouds billowed all day, blackening then clearing, then building up in white again. The predicted storm held off!

Although I’m happy to rest my feet after our 15.5-mile walk, the scenery was delightful, diverse, and a welcome contrast to the rocky forest ridges. Enjoy the photos!

image

From  forest to cornfield!

image

Narrow path traverses fields.

image

Historic Sycamore in Boiling Springs.

image

Pastoral land, newly harvested.

image

A meadow of Milkweed for Monarch butterflies breaks the crops.

image

Clouds billow above the oats.

image

Safe crossing over the highway where we get off the trail for a night in a hotel near Carlisle, PA.

In joy,
Regina

If you’r reading this from my Facebook post, click this link to sign up for the email version!

Vision

June 20, 2016

It helps me keep going to have someone to talk with about my dreams. Last night, Mary Campbell, whom I had coached to accomplish her 5-day walk in Scotland, talked with me about my vision for HeartSinging Walks Community. Here’s the recording from our half-hour conversation. Listen in !

  • Walking evokes and expresses an Inner Journey
  • Regina’s approach starts with this awareness
  • This could help people just getting started with walking for health
  • Several structures could make it available to more people

Join in the conversation!
http://audioacrobat.com/email/ENNV66sqV

Comment here, or send Regina an email: regina@forgivenesswalks.com

 

Tornado Watch

June 16, 2016
The day started – and ended – with rain! In between, we walked 17 miles, stopping once for a thunderstorm and once for a tornado watch.

Arching

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June 8, 2016
We camped in the vicinity of Pass Mtn which was just north of Thornton Gap, Luray, VA.

Our camp was off the trail on a bed of moss between rocks, a surprisingly good find! I sat on a rock away from the tarp, painting as the sun set, feeling grateful to have this centering, fulfilling experience in which to pour the tensions of the day.

Zero Day

June 19, 2016

First zero day (day 17) Luxuriating at Cobblestone Inn in Waynesboro, PA. A Zero Day is hiker lingo for a day with no hiking!
They have a grill out on the lawn of the inn. We used it to support our canister stove to cook salmon patties from WalMart, which is literally  next  door! Yeah, I have mixed feelings about shopping there, but give in to the convenience. In addition to off-trail food, we bought another fuel canister ($5 instead of $12 at Big Meadows!), and I replaced my underwear, an important clothing strategy – either buy a new pair or include in a maildrop every few weeks.
Catching up on journaling, researching itinerary details for later, soaking in the hot tub, drinking water, eating fresh food, ressssting, watching a Clint Eastwood movie, and chatting with another family’s members gathering for a wedding. The mental and physical break from the trail is rejuvenating. Even something I love as much as walking and sleeping  in the woods is enhanced  by stepping away for a day!

Back to the trail tomorrow, refreshed and renewed and rested.

In joy,
Regina
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Happy day, yesterday, crossing into Pennsylvania

Trail Visitors!!

June 18, 2016
Two meetings today!
Dawn, a coaching friend from many years ago!

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And Robin, the new Ridgerunner, in her element!

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I love visitors on the trail!

In joy,
Regina

Sore Feet

June 15, 2106
Another hiker asked what to do about sore feet from stepping on all the rocks in Virginia. Yes, there are literally mountains of rocks on the trail! Here are some of my thoughts.

I’m all about balancing the Inner Journey with the Outer Journey. What I do with sore feet, after  assessing for physical injury, is go inside myself and ask in there! “Why am I walking? What do you need, feet? How can I step lightly on my journey, on the Earth, on whatever is before me?” Those kinds of questions.
I met a hiker walking through Shenandoah National Park in sandals. He walked like a monk! Each step with singular purpose in itself.
I’ve used arnica tincture for bruises and anointed my feet daily with lavender oil, blessing and honoring them. I believe that you have a beautiful, unique journey that blesses us and the trail. The trail is a blank canvas on which your unique journey is painted.  Maybe there’s an Inner Journey here.

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This is the kind of perspective we’ll give to our journeys in my HeartSinging Walk Community. If this resonates with YOU, come take a look!
HeartSinging  Walk Community

Or pass this along to someone who might like this way of preparing for a walk! Thanks!

In joy,
Regina

Milemarker

June 15, 2016
Harpers Ferry, WV.

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My heart sings reaching the ATC headquarters with “Hiker John”, free to share the classic hiker photo.

I look back in the archives and find my solo photo,

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2007.

 

Back then, in October, 2007, I felt awesome having walked over half of the trail. But, I wasn’t ready to claim that I had found a hiking partner. My husband was still at home in Georgia. I believed that the world of the trail and the world of home were separate.  What a journey of inner exploration, radical forgiveness, and outward change it’s been during the time between these photos.

I now know and experience that there is one world, one of joyous prosperity that blends walking with working, partnership and fulfillment.

Today I celebrate and acknowledge the journey undertaken to unite those worlds.

My heart sings!

Trailboss

June 14, 2016
From a campsite north of Raven Rocks, VA to Econolodge in Bolivar, WV, including a short visit at Blackburn Trail Center.

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Crossing the Shenandoah River in the evening on SR 340.

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Mountain Laurel fading

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Red Toad

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Goodbye Virginia! Hello WV

This section of trail is called “The Rollercoaster” because of its quick up and down pattern. Both times I’ve walked this 13-mile stretch I have had strong judgements about that name!

The whole way, I’m grumbling these sentiments: “There’s no coasting whatsoever in the Roller Coaster! Roller coasters are one-way rides. This one has two directions! It would be more accurate to call it Stegasaurus Back Or Rust Saw! Rocks, rocks, rocks make it a diligent dance of danger. Definitely not a roller coaster!!!”

I’m glad we took the .37-mile side trip to the Blackburn Trail Center, a workcenter for the Potomas Appalachian Trail Club. My Atlanta friend, Chickenfeathers, reached it just two days ahead of us. He had sent me a message to be sure to stop in and talk with Trailboss. We obliged. Trailboss answered all our questions  about the Roller Coaster, ending my judgements.

The trail through northern Viriginia, he explained, is a result of quick thinking and bold action to secure the 1,000 ft wide corridor before roads and subdivisions swallowed up the forest in the 1980’s. The trail had been a roadwalk and the roads were getting bigger and wider then, including I-66. Thanks to the AT community, the trail has a remote feeling amidst the developed area.

There was no room for a gently winding trail, so up and down it goes! The name, Roller Coaster, came from a hiker, not the builders. Someone called it that and the name stuck.

A beautiful snack spot in the afternoon, at Buzzard Rocks,  fortified us for our afternoon walk into West Virginia and down the slope to the west side of the Shenandoah River and a comfy bed at Econolodge.

A beautiful 16-mile day!

In joy,
Regina